Rabbie Burns: Scotland’s Greatest Bard

Burns Night is a great tradition in Scotland.

Every year on the day of his birth, families across Scotland – and the world – sit down to a big plate of Haggis, neeps & tatties.

(That’s Haggis, turnip & potatoes)

Celebrating Robert Burns and his work, for me, typifies Scotland’s love affair with language and history. We have a vibrant, colourful history and it is something we are incredibly proud of.

Whether it be our victories and defeats, our great architects, engineers and inventors, or our authors, bards and glorious thinkers; we have many things to be proud of.

Our love for our language and culture is central to our very being, and Burns is the perfect figure through which to express ourselves.

I’ll leave you with a small excerpt from Tam O’ Shanter, enjoy!

“But Tam kend what was what fu’ brawlie:

There was ae winsome wench and waulie,

That night enlisted in the core,

Lang after ken’d on Carrick shore;

(For mony a beast to dead she shot,

And perish’d mony a bonie boat,

And shook baith meikle corn and bear,

And kept the country-side in fear.)

Her cutty-sark, o’ Paisley harn

That while a lassie she had worn,

In longitude tho’ sorely scanty,

It was her best, and she was vauntie,-

Ah! little ken’d thy reverend grannie,

That sark she coft for he wee Nannie,

Wi’ twa pund Scots, (’twas a’ her riches),

Wad ever grac’d a dance of witches!”

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